Tag - Arabian Gulf

Saudi Arabia Photo Gallery

The historic old town of Jeddah, the Al Balad district, is registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site and is one of many highlights of Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia Photo Gallery

This is a Saudi Arabia Photo Gallery. To read about this destination, please refer to my Saudi Arabia Travel Guide.


All images are copyright! If you wish to purchase any images for commercial use, please contact me via the Contact page.


 

 


About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel. I’ve been travelling the world for 33 years and, 209 countries and territories, and – seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact me via the contact page.

I hope you this gallery and my website.

Safe travels!

Darren


Follow me on Instagram: 


 

Bahrain Photo Gallery

Fort Arad

Bahrain Photo Gallery

This is a Bahrain Photo Gallery. To read about this destination, please refer to my Bahrain Travel Guide.


All images are copyright! If you wish to purchase any images for commercial use, please contact me via the Contact page.


 


About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel. I’ve been travelling the world for 33 years and, 209 countries and territories, and – seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact me via the contact page.

I hope you this gallery and my website.

Safe travels!

Darren


Follow me on Instagram: 


 

Kuwait Photo Gallery

Kuwaitis are very patriotic, with their flag featured on all sorts of merchandise.

Kuwait Photo Gallery

This is a Kuwait Photo Gallery. To read about this destination, please refer to my Kuwait Travel Guide.


All images are copyright! If you wish to purchase any images for commercial use, please contact me via the Contact page.


 


About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel. I’ve been travelling the world for 33 years and, 209 countries and territories, and – seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact me via the contact page.

I hope you this gallery and my website.

Safe travels!

Darren


Follow me on Instagram: 


 

Qatar Photo Gallery

Al Zubarah fort aglow in the afternoon sunlight.

Qatar Photo Gallery

This is a Qatar Photo Gallery. To read about this destination, please refer to my Qatar Travel Guide


All images are copyright! If you wish to purchase any images for commercial use, please contact me via the Contact page.


 


About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel. I’ve been travelling the world for 33 years and, 209 countries and territories, and – seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact me via the contact page.

I hope you this gallery and my website.

Safe travels!

Darren


Follow me on Instagram: 


 

Saudi Arabia Travel Guide

Located on the outskirts of Dhahran, the King Abdulaziz Centre for World Culture looms large over the surrounding desert plain.

Saudi Arabia Travel Guide

Welcome to the taste2travel Saudi Arabia Travel Guide!

Date Visited: October 2019

Introduction

For most of its history, Saudi Arabia was ‘the impossible country’ to visit. While business travellers and religious pilgrims were able to secure visas, tourist visas were almost impossible to obtain. On the 28th of September 2019 everything changed, with the country introducing its new, simplified, tourist e-Visa.

The historic old town of Jeddah, the Al Balad district, is registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site and is one of many highlights of Saudi Arabia.

The historic old town of Jeddah, the Al Balad district, is registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site and is one of many highlights of Saudi Arabia.

The launch of the e-Visa was accompanied by a media advertising blitz which appeared on social media platforms such as Instagram and  Twitter, on the internet and on international news networks such as BBC and CNN.

Colourful street art in Dammam.

Colourful street art in Dammam.

Known as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, overnight, the most reclusive and mysterious country in the world became one of the most accessible, with multiple-entry, 12-month visas being issued just seven minutes after submitting an application. The visa application process, which I’ve fully documented here, is very straight-forward and easy.

Vision 2030

Why the change in policy?

Due to its oil wealth, the Kingdom had never needed to trouble itself with tourism. However, Saudi Vision 2030, a strategic plan created by the de-facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (MbS), calls for the country to reduce its dependence on oil by tapping extra revenue sources and privatising many government agencies. The opening of the country to tourism and the IPO of Saudi Aramco is part of Vision 2030.

A museum display at the King Abdulaziz Centre for World Culture in Dhahran.

A museum display at the King Abdulaziz Centre for World Culture in Dhahran.

The Saudi plan is not unique within the region, with similar ‘Vision 2030’ plans currently being implemented by Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Qatar, all of which have the common goal of reducing each country’s dependence on oil revenue. Oman has a similar plan, but has given itself 10 additional years, with its Oman Vision 2040.

A KSA (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) sign at Al Rudaf Park in Taif.

A KSA (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) sign at Al Rudaf Park in Taif.

What’s it like to Travel in Saudi Arabia?

This guide describes a coast-to-coast road trip which I made in a rental car, driving 1,451 km from the Red Sea port city of Jeddah to the Arabian Gulf city of Dammam. Saudi Arabia is full of interesting and diverse sights.


Video: Driving into Riyadh from the west. 


The Kingdom has now opened its doors to tourism and, while I didn’t meet any other travellers during my time in the country, now is a good time to visit, before the hordes arrive.

Camels are a common sight while driving through the vast desert landscapes of Saudi Arabia.

Camels are a common sight while driving through the vast desert landscapes of Saudi Arabia.

The Saudis are very warm, curious, friendly and welcoming and are rolling out the red carpet for tourists. Travelling in the country is very easy and straight-forward and is made even more agreeable thanks to excellent infrastructure, competitively priced accommodation and ample restaurants – all of which are detailed in the relevant sections below.

A display at the Al Amoudi museum in Mecca.

A display at the Al Amoudi museum in Mecca.

I arrived at King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah and can attest that the immigration process was one of the most pleasant experiences anywhere in the world (see the ‘Visa Requirements‘ section below for more details).

There are some special social considerations which are unique to Saudi – these are outlined in the ‘Saudi Society‘ section below.

Breaking News



Breaking News – Saudi Arabia Opening the Door to More Tourists

Saudi Arabia eVisa update.

Saudi Arabia eVisa update.
Source: Visit Saudi website.

On the 10th of January 2020, the Saudi Commission for Tourism & National Heritage (SCTH) announced that visitors can now use existing UK, US, and Schengen-area country visas to obtain a Saudi Arabia visitor visa at airport arrival halls – regardless of their citizenship.

‏Visitors intending to benefit from the new regulation must have previously used the visa to travel to any one of the listed Schengen countries, the UK or the US before entering Saudi Arabia.

As per the announcement: “Recipients of tourist or commercial visas to these countries can now enter the Kingdom and receive the tourist visa only through the visa upon arrival method and are not included in the e-visa”. 



Location

Riyadh Saudi Arabia

Located in the geographical heart of the Middle East, Saudi Arabia is the largest country in the region, occupying 80% of the Arabian Peninsula.

Bordered by Jordan to the north, Iraq to the northeast, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates on the east, Oman on the southeast, and Yemen to the south, Saudi Arabia is 95% desert and is comprised mostly of flat, barren land-forms.

An exception to this are the soaring Sarawat mountains, which run parallel to the Red Sea. The Sarawat range is home to the country’s highest peaks, including Jabal Sawda, the highest at 3,000 metres (9,843 feet) above sea level. The range drops abruptly on the western side toward the Red Sea, leaving the narrow coastal plain of Tihamah.

The country is bordered by the Red Sea to the west and the Arabian Gulf to the northeast and sits on the Arabia Plate, which separated from the Africa Plate 25 million years ago, forming the Red Sea Rift.

An isolated mesa, Al Qarah Mountain is a key attraction in the Al-Ahsa oasis.

An isolated mesa, Al Qarah Mountain is a key attraction in the Al-Ahsa oasis.

People

A Saudi visitor at Kingdom Tower in Riyadh wearing his white 'Thobe'.

A Saudi visitor at Kingdom Tower in Riyadh wearing his white ‘Thobe’.

Of the 22 countries which comprise the Arab League, Saudi Arabia is the second largest (in terms of area), after Algeria. The majority (90%) of Saudi citizens are ethnically Arab, with most being descendants of tribal Bedouins. The remaining 10% of the population are Afro-Asian. Saudi society is largely urban, with 80% of Saudis living in ten major urban centres, which are:

1 Riyadh – population 6,506,700
2 Jeddah – 3,976,400
3 Mecca – 1,919,900
4 Medina – 1,271,800
5 Hofuf – 1,136,900
6 Taif – 1,109,800
7 Dammam – 975,800
8 Buraida – 658,600
9 Khobar – 626,200
10 Tabuk – 609,000

Outside of these centres, the country consists of large expanses of empty, arid desert.

Street art in Deera Square, Riyadh.

Street art in Deera Square, Riyadh.

The country is also home to a large, mostly-male, Muslim, workforce of expatriate ‘guest workers’, from Egypt, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines. It’s estimated that these immigrants comprise 37% of the total Saudi population. Additionally, there are an estimated 100,000 Westerners in Saudi Arabia, most of whom live in private compounds.

Camels

Just a few of the estimated 800,000 camels which can be seen roaming through the Saudi desert.

Just a few of the estimated 800,000 camels which can be seen roaming through the Saudi desert.

It’s estimated that there are around 800,000 camels roaming the deserts of Saudi Arabia. All highways are lined with camel-proof fences to prevent these desert nomads from straying onto the highways. In many places you can stop your car, approach the fence and find yourself surrounded by a small herd of curious, friendly camels. Not once was I spat at!

The camels of Saudi Arabia are dromedaries, which is the largest of the three different types of camel. The species’ distinctive features include its long, curved neck, narrow chest and a single hump.

Politics

King Salman (right) and his son, Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman.

King Salman (right) and his son, Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman.

Saudi Arabia is an autocratic, absolute monarchy, with the King serving as head of state and head of government. The first King of Saudi Arabia was King Abdulaziz (known in the West as Ibn Saud), who, in 1902, conducted a raid on Al Masmak fort in Riyadh, defeating the Ottomans. From Riyadh, King Abdulaziz reunited all Saudi lands, forming modern day Saudi Arabia.

Since his rule, all Saudi Kings have been sons of King Abdulaziz. Following is a list of Kings of Saudi Arabia (1932 – present):

  • King Abdulaziz (Ibn Saud) – ruled from 1932 – 1953
  • King Saud (Saud bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 1953 – 1964
  • King Faisal (Faisal bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 1964 – 1975
  • King Khalid (Khalid bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 1975 – 1982
  • King Fahd (Fahd bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 1982 – 2005
  • King Abdullah (Abdullah bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 2005 – 2015
  • King Salman (Salman bin Abdulaziz): ruled from 2015 – present

Due to the autocratic nature of the government, national elections and political parties are not permitted. Politics in Saudi Arabia takes places within the Royal family and between the Royal family and the rest of Saudi society. The Saudi government is rated by various international agencies as ‘authoritarian’.

The headquarters of the Religious Police on Deera square in Riyadh. The sign reads "Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice".

The headquarters of the Religious Police on Deera square in Riyadh. The sign reads “Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice”.

The current ruler of Saudi Arabia is King Salman. His son, 34-year old, Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (MbS), is considered the de-facto ruler and has recently led many, modernising, reforms within the country, which has made him very popular among younger, more progressive Saudis.

Reforms have included the introduction of regulations restricting the powers of the religious police, who are now largely confined to their barracks. The removal of the ban on female drivers in June of 2018, the weakening of the restrictive ‘male-guardianshipsystem which requires a female to obtain permission from their male guardian for activities such as getting a job, travelling internationally or getting married.

MbS has also stated that woman no longer need to cover their hair or wear the all-covering Abaya, although almost all women continue to wear the abaya as this has been the cultural norm for generations. While the abaya remains the norm, a small number of woman are choosing not to cover their hair. While largely popular at home, MbS has as also engendering a number of controversies, including the 2017 arrest of members of the Saudi royal family and the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, which resulted in international condemnation.

Saudi Society

Street art in the east coast city of Dammam.

Street art in the east coast city of Dammam.

Saudi society could generally be described as deeply religious, conservative, traditional, and family-oriented. There are many limitations and prohibitions on behaviour and dress which are strictly enforced both legally and socially, often more so than in other Muslim countries.

However, many of the traditional restrictions have been lifting recently, under the leadership of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (MbS), including allowing women to drive, removing the requirement for woman to cover their hair (I would estimate 20% of woman are currently choosing not to cover their hair) and even talk of removing the requirement of woman wearing the all-covering Abeya.

Some of the considerations when travelling in Saudi Arabia include the following:

Prayer Times

All establishments stop their operations during prayer times, which is five times a day. Saudi Arabia is the only Muslim country that imposes such a requirement.

If you’re at a shopping mall, an announcement will be made 15 minutes before prayer time, advising that the mall will be closing. If you are driving a car you will not be able to fill up during prayer time as all petrol stations also close. All businesses are required to close with the closure lasting between 30-40 minutes. While all doors are locked and curtains drawn during pray times, if you’re already in a café or restaurant, you will be allowed to finish your meal, coffee etc.

It seemed my body clock was perfectly in tune with the pray schedule since every time I decided to head to a café or restaurant, the call to pray rang out over town, closing everything down.

A good way to keep track of pray times is with an app such as Muslim Pro which allows you to view the prayer times at your precise location.

Intermingling of the Sexes

All restaurants in Saudi Arabia have separate entrances for 'Singles' and 'Families'.

All restaurants in Saudi Arabia have separate entrances for ‘Singles’ and ‘Families’.

Rules exist in Saudi society which restrict mingling between males and females. Restaurants, fast-food chains and coffee houses, such as Starbucks, are all partitioned into two sections, one for ‘single‘ males and the other for ‘families‘. When entering a restaurant, you should first ensure you are entering through the correct door. I once, accidentally, entered a restaurant using the ‘family’ entrance and was quickly directed back outside so I could enter into the ‘singles’ section.

As illustrated in the image above, this McDonald’s restaurant in Riyadh has clear signage, plus a dividing wall, to avoid any confusion. Inside the restaurant, the partition wall continues to the counter, ensuring you cannot peer into the other half of the restaurant. It’s all about ensuring there’s no unnecessary ‘mingling’.

Despite its name, the ‘Singles’ section isn’t a happy-go-lucky singles club but is for single males. It is sometimes given the more appropriate label of “Bachelor’s section”. The family section is for any families, couples or single woman.

There are a few exceptions to this rule, one being the numerous coffee roasting cafés whose clientele are mostly young, progressive Saudis. In these establishments, there is no partition and you are free to sit anywhere you like.

What to Wear

All Saudi woman and most female foreigners, wear the Abeya.

All Saudi woman and most female foreigners, wear the Abeya.

Everyone in Saudi Arabia is fully covered, including foreigners. Woman wear the (usually black) Abeya while men wear the (always white) Thobe. While it is culturally acceptable for men to wear t-shirts with long trousers, most Saudi men choose to wear the Thobe. While I travelled through the country, I wore a pair of jeans and a shirt.

Majda and friend, two European expats, setting a stylish tone in their Abeya's while watching the sunset over the Red sea from a cafe in Jeddah. Almost all female expats wear the Abeya. Source: Majda Korjenic

Majda and friend, two European expats, setting a stylish tone in their Abeya’s while watching the sunset over the Red sea from a cafe in Jeddah. Almost all female expats wear the Abeya. Source: Majda Korjenic

Most foreign woman I saw wore the Abeya (without the headscarf) and while Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (MbS) has indicated that woman no longer need to wear the Abeya (but need to dress modestly and respectfully), breaking this ingrained, cultural habit is not easy, with 99% of woman still choosing to cover up.

A sign inside a branch of the 'Next' clothing store in Jeddah indicates that only 'Families' are allowed in the store.

A sign inside a branch of the ‘Next’ clothing store in Jeddah indicates that only ‘Families’ are allowed in the store.

Flag

The flag of Saudi Arabia is always double-sided so that the 'shahada' reads correctly, from right to left, from either side.

The flag of Saudi Arabia is always double-sided so that the ‘shahada’ reads correctly, from right to left, from either side.

The flag of Saudi Arabia features an Islamic inscription, or shahada (an Islamic declaration of faith) in white, which is on set on a background of green, a colour which represents Islam. The shahada reads “There is no god but Allah; Muhammad is the Messenger of God.”

The flag is manufactured with identical obverse and reverse sides, to ensure the shahada reads correctly, from right to left, from either side. A white sword symbolises the importance of the inscription by underlining it and also stands for the strictness in applying justice, under Sharia law.

Because the shahada is considered holy, the flag is never flown at half-mast, nor is it used to adorn trinkets, souvenirs, T-shirts or other items. In one famous controversy, regarding (unintentional) misuse of the flag, US troops in Afghanistan, in 2007, distributed FIFA World Cup soccer balls to Afghan children, which featured the flags of World Cup participant countries, including the Saudi flag. This led to demonstrations in Afghanistan, where the US was accused of insulting Islam. Saudi officials said that kicking the shahada with the foot was completely unacceptable.

Currency

The latest series of the riyal note features the portrait of King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud.

The latest series of the riyal note features the portrait of King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud.

The currency of Saudi Arabia is the riyal, which is issued by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority. The riyal is pegged to the United States dollar at a rate of $1 USD = 3.75 SAR with notes issued in denominations of 5, 10, 50, 100 and 500 riyals and coins issued in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 halalas and bimetallic 1 and 2 riyal coins.

The two riyal note series in circulation - the old series (left side) featuring the portrait of King Abdullah and the current series featuring King Salman.

The two riyal note series in circulation – the old series (left side) featuring the portrait of King Abdullah and the current series featuring King Salman.

The current version of the riyal note (series #6), features a portrait of the monarch, King Salman. Also, in circulation is note series #5, which features a portrait of the previous monarch, King Abdullah.

The 500 riyal note features a portrait of King Abdullah.

The 500 riyal note features a portrait of King Abdullah.

Costs

Suggested daily budgets: 

  • Backpacker: Up to 450 SAR (USD$120) per day.
  • Flashpacker: Between 450 – 1,000 SAR (USD$120 – 266) per day.
  • Top End: 1,000 SAR + (USD$266 +) per day

Sample costs: 

  • Coca Cola (0.33 litre bottle): 2.55 SAR (US$0.68)
  • Water (0.33 litre bottle): 1 SAR (US$0.27)
  • Cappuccino (IDMI Coffee Roasting Company, Riyadh): 14 SAR (US$3.73)
  • Car Rental (Hertz): 98 SAR (US$26.00)
  • Litre of fuel: SAR 1.52 (US$0.41)
  • Local Bus Ticket: 3 SAR (USD$0.80)
  • Meal (inexpensive restaurant): 20 SAR (US$5.33)
  • Meal for 2 (mid-range restaurant): 100 SAR (US$26.50)
  • Combo meal at McDonald’s: 20 SAR (US$5.33)
  • Room in a mid-range hotel (Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel Jeddah): 300 SAR (US$80)
  • Room in a top-end hotel (Ritz-Carlton Jeddah): 1000 SAR (US$265)

Connectivity

One of the first things I purchase when I arrive in a new destination is a local SIM card and if you plan to use Google maps or Waze for navigation, or request the occasional Uber, then a local SIM card is indispensable.

The best network coverage is offered by the state monopoly, Saudi Telecom Company (STC), who offer a range of reasonably priced plans. In addition to the cost of the plan, each SIM card costs 30 SAR. As with everything in Saudi, you will need to present your passport and e-Visa when purchasing your SIM.

Sights

From the pristine coral reefs of the Red Sea, to the numerous UNESCO World Heritage sites, to the towering Sarawat mountains, to the vast desert plains, Saudi Arabia is an incredibly diverse travel destination, full of incredible sights which have hardly been explored by tourists. Now is a great time to visit the Kingdom!

Local Tour Operator

Whenever I arrive in a new destination, I arrive sans itinerary, preferring to create an itinerary once I have consulted local tourist information centres and other specialists. Currently in Saudi, there are no tourist information offices, these are yet to be developed – Google image search is your best friend!

I was however very fortunate to bump into a local tour operator, Saleh, while in a café in Jeddah who sat down and mapped out a suitable itinerary for my road trip across the country. His suggestions opened my eyes to places I had no idea about. If you would like to organise any part of your Saudi trip through an established, local operator, then I would totally recommend contacting Saleh Altassan who is the owner of Peninsula Caravans, a tour company based in Jeddah but a company that organises tours throughout the Kingdom.

Jeddah

Jeddah is full of large public artworks with the Mameluke Mosque Lanterns being one of the most striking and beautiful.

Jeddah is full of large public artworks with the Mameluke Mosque Lanterns being one of the most striking and beautiful.

Of all the destinations I visited in Saudi Arabia, Jeddah was my favourite. An historic crossroads of pilgrims and traders, and the traditional gateway to Mecca, Jeddah is the most fascinating of Saudi Arabia’s major cities, with a cosmopolitan and liberal air which is unique in this ultraconservative country.

Said to be the place where the mother of humanity, ‘Eve’, was laid to rest, Jeddah has existed since at least the time of Alexander the Great, who visited the city between 323 and 356 BC.

Al Balad 

Typical houses in the Al Balad district of Jeddah.

Typical houses in the Al Balad district of Jeddah.

Founded in the 7th century, the historic district of Al Balad (translates as ‘The Town‘), is the highlight of Jeddah, one which was recently registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The narrow streets of the old town are lined with antique homes which are constructed from Red Sea, coral-stone, blocks.

Canons in Al-Balad, which were captured from Portuguese invaders, lie beneath the oldest flagpole in Jeddah.

Canons in Al-Balad, which were captured from Portuguese invaders, lie beneath the oldest flagpole in Jeddah.

A standout feature of the houses of Al-Balad are the Hejazi mashrabiyya, colourful, wooden lattice covers which enclose all windows and balconies, allowing hot air to escape while keeping a house cool and allowing occupants to look out while blocking any prying eyes.

A fine example of 'Hejazi mashrabiyya', wooden lattice work, on a home in Al Balad.

A fine example of ‘Hejazi mashrabiyya’, wooden lattice work, on a home in Al Balad.

The entire old town is very much in a state of disrepair. The government has selected 450 buildings which will be renovated during a renovation program which is currently ongoing.

Zawia 97

A beautiful example of 'Hejazi Mashrabiyya' (wooden lattice) which was created using Indian mahogany by the students at the Zawia 97 workshop.

A beautiful example of ‘Hejazi Mashrabiyya’ (wooden lattice) which was created using Indian mahogany by the students at the Zawia 97 workshop.

Tucked away in a small courtyard behind Nasseef house in Al-Balad, the Zawia 97 workshop is the brain child of one local, passionate artist, Ahmad Angawi, who is busy training students (mostly female) the art of woodworking with the aim of creating beautiful examples of Hejazi Mashrabiyya, the lattice work which can be found on all buildings in Al-Balad.

The students at the Zawia 97 workshop in Jeddah are mostly female.

The students at the Zawia 97 workshop in Jeddah are mostly female.

Originally from Mecca, Ahmad now calls Jeddah home and has found world-wide acclaim through his artwork. He recently created intricate wooden screens for an Islamic gallery at the British Museum in London. A short biography of Ahmed can be seen on YouTube.

Pieces of carved mahogany at the Zawia 97 workshop in Jeddah, ready to be assembled into a lattice jigsaw.

Pieces of carved mahogany at the Zawia 97 workshop in Jeddah, ready to be assembled into a lattice jigsaw.

The screens, which are constructed from Indian mahogany, are made without nails and glue, requiring precise cuts, with each screen fitting together like a large wooden jigsaw.

A green laneway in the Al Balad historic district of Jeddah.

A green laneway in the Al Balad historic district of Jeddah.

Nasseef House

The historic Nasseef house lies at the heart of the Al Balad district.

The historic Nasseef house lies at the heart of the Al Balad district.

Constructed between 1872 and 1881, Nasseef house is one of Jeddah’s best-restored old coral houses and lies at the heart of the Al-Balad district.

Built by a local wealthy merchant, and governor of Jeddah, Omar Nasseef Efendi, the house was used as a base by Abdulaziz Ibn Saud when he entered the city in December 1925, after the siege of Jeddah.

As of 2009, the house has served as a museum and cultural centre but is currently in a state of disrepair and was closed for renovation at the time of my visit.

Bab Makkah

One of the gates of Al-Balad, Bab Makkah (Mecca gate) marks the start of the road to the holy city of Mecca.

One of the gates of Al-Balad, Bab Makkah (Mecca gate) marks the start of the road to the holy city of Mecca.

In the 7th Century, Jeddah was established as both a major port for Indian Ocean trade routes, and the entry point for Muslim pilgrims who arrived by sea on their way to the religious city of Mecca.

Miswak vendor in Jeddah old town. Used in the region for more than 7,000 years, 'miswak' is a teeth cleaning twig which comes from the Arak tree.

Miswak vendor in Jeddah old town. Used in the region for more than 7,000 years, ‘miswak’ is a teeth cleaning twig which comes from the Arak tree.

All pilgrims would have passed through Bab Makkah, which marked the start of the road from Jeddah to Mecca. The current gate is a re-creation.

Jeddah Flagpole

At 170-metres high, the Jeddah flagpole is the tallest in the world.

At 170-metres high, the Jeddah flagpole is the tallest in the world.

Located on King Abdullah Square, the 170-metre high Jeddah flagpole is the highest flagpole in the world. A huge double-sided Saudi Arabian flag, measuring 49.5 metres (162 ft) by 33 metres (108 ft) and weighing 570 kilograms was raised for the first time on the 23rd of September 2014, as part of Saudi Arabia National Day celebrations.

Did you know? The 2nd highest flagpole (165-metres) is located in Dushanbe, Tajikistan (click on the link to read my Tajikistan Travel Guide, which features the flagpole).

Corniche

Stunning, daily sunsets over the Red Sea are guaranteed from the Corniche in Jeddah.

Stunning, daily sunsets over the Red Sea are guaranteed from the Corniche in Jeddah.

The place to be in the evening is the wonderful Corniche, a stretch of Red Sea coastline which has been transformed into a pleasant walkway and leisure space. The Corniche is lined with benches and picnic shelters, where locals relax and watch the blazing sun set into the Red Sea.

Al Rahma Mosque

Locals enjoying a Red Sea sunset near the Floating mosque.

Locals enjoying a Red Sea sunset near the Floating mosque.

Located at the northern end of the Corniche, Al Rahma Mosque (aka the Floating mosque) sits on stilts and seemingly ‘floats’ on the Red Sea. The beach alongside the mosque is a favourite gathering place for local families at sunset.

King Fahd’s Fountain

The King Fahd fountain in Jeddah - the tallest fountain in the world.

The King Fahd fountain in Jeddah – the tallest fountain in the world.

Also located on the Corniche, King Fahd’s Fountain is the tallest fountain in the world, jetting water to a maximum height of 260 metres. The fountain was donated to the city by King Fahd and was constructed between 1980 and 1983 and launched in 1985. The fountain does not operate during the day but is activated at 6 pm each evening and is best viewed from the Corniche.

 

North Coast Beaches

The Red Sea beach at Silver Sands, north of Jeddah.

The Red Sea beach at Silver Sands, north of Jeddah.

A short drive north of Jeddah, the Red Sea coast is lined with private beach resorts which are hidden away behind high security walls.

One of the most popular is the Silver Sands resort which is very popular with ex-pats and more liberal, young Saudis. The resort is totally hidden away behind a white, unmarked concrete wall which isolates it from the outside world.

To enter the resort, I had to leave my passport with the security guard, who sits in an unmarked booth at the main gate. It’s all so hush-hush that while Google directed me to the general neighbourhood, I had to stop and ask a local shopkeeper for the exact location, there is no signage anywhere!

To enter the resort, I had to pay a hefty SAR 150 admission fee which entitled me to use the beautiful beach and facilities. For the price, you get to relax as you would on any other beach in the world. This is the only place in Saudi Arabia where I saw females (including Saudis) relaxing in bikinis. While inside the resort, it was hard to believe I was in ultraconservative Saudi Arabia.

As part of its tourism drive, the government is planning to develop a luxury Red Sea resort which is known as The Red Sea Project.

The beach at Silver Sands where ex-pats and Saudis come to relax and play.

The beach at Silver Sands where ex-pats and Saudis come to relax and play.

Mecca

The one sight in Mecca which is accessible to Non-Muslims, the Al-Amoudi museum (aka The Vertical Museum).

The one sight in Mecca which is accessible to Non-Muslims, the Al-Amoudi museum (aka The Vertical Museum).

While all areas of Saudi Arabia are now open to tourists, the two holy cities of Mecca and Medina are off-limits to non-Muslims. Police checkpoints on all access roads into the cities ensure that non-Muslims do not enter the ‘Haram‘ zone, an area around Mecca and Medina which is only accessible to Muslims.

Non-Muslim Bypass Road

Non-Muslims must follow the red signs to avoid entering the holy city of Mecca.

Non-Muslims must follow the red signs to avoid entering the holy city of Mecca.

The main east-west highway (route 80M), which crosses the country from Jeddah to Dammam via Riyadh, passes through the centre of Mecca.

However, Non-Muslims must take the longer and slower (but also very scenic) route 298 which makes a circuitous detour, deep into the desert, to the south of Mecca. This detour adds more than 100-km to the journey between Jeddah to Taif.

The turn-off for Non-Muslims which leads to the Mecca bypass road (route 298).

The turn-off for Non-Muslims which leads to the Mecca bypass road (route 298).

Red signage on the highway will direct you onto the bypass road, even while your navigational app (Google Maps or Waze) will be directing you to stay on the main highway.

You must turn-off before entering the city limits to avoid any problems at the police checkpoint.  

The circuitous route 298, Mecca bypass road, adds more than 100 additional kilometres to the journey from Jeddah to Taif.

The circuitous route 298, Mecca bypass road, adds more than 100 additional kilometres to the journey from Jeddah to Taif.

Route 298 is lined with a variety of camouflaged speed cameras, with some installed inside beige-coloured housing and placed in front of beige-coloured rock walls or others installed in grey-coloured housing, sitting alongside grey-coloured guard rails. The road is normally empty of traffic and has a low speed limit. Beware and don’t forget to smile for the camera!

Al-Amoudi Museum

The friendly guides at the Al-Amoudi museum, Naeem (left) and Fazad.

The friendly guides at the Al-Amoudi museum, Naeem (left) and Fazad.

Despite the access restriction, there is one sight in Mecca which welcomes Non-Muslim visitors, the Al-Amoudi Museum (aka The Vertical Museum), which has been deliberately located one kilometre outside the city limits, making it accessible to all.

Named after its founder, Abu Bakr Al-Amoudi, the highlight of this fascinating museum is a treasure trove of relics from the Kaaba, the most sacred site in Islam which is located at the centre of Islam’s most important mosque, the Great Mosque of Mecca.

The gold-plated 'Meezab-e-Rahmah' (The water outlet of mercy), a relic from the Kaaba.

The gold-plated ‘Meezab-e-Rahmah’ (The water outlet of mercy), a relic from the Kaaba.

The collection of relics includes the gold-plated ‘Meezab-e-Rahmah‘ which drains water from the roof of the Kaaba. Other relics from the Kaaba include gold-plated door locks, holy textiles which once covered the Kaaba, speaker systems and much more.

The door lock from the Kaaba on display at the Al-Amoudi museum in Mecca.

The door lock from the Kaaba on display at the Al-Amoudi museum in Mecca.

While viewing this fascinating collection, I was struck by the ironic fact that, while, as a Non-Muslim, I’m not able to enter Mecca, and will never get to see the Kaaba, here in this small museum, I could get up close to the holiest of objects from the most important mosque in the Islamic world.

Apart from the display of Kaaba relics, the museum contains numerous mud-brick structures which house exhibits that showcase Saudi heritage, culture and traditions.

The city gate of Mecca which spans the main highway from Jeddah.

The city gate of Mecca which spans the main highway from Jeddah.

Access: The museum is located on a service road which runs alongside the main highway (M80), just 1-km from the twin arches which cross the highway and indicate the entrance to Mecca. The police checkpoint lies just beyond the arches, if you’re not a Muslim, you should avoid reaching the checkpoint.

If you enter the museum name into your navigation app, you will be directed here without getting into any trouble. If approaching Mecca from Jeddah, the exit to the museum, from the highway, is the final exit before the twin arches. From the service road, you can drive up to the arches.

When I arrived at the museum, the main gate was closed, but a sign on the gate provided a phone number (Tel: 0555043044) which I dialled. I spoke to the caretaker, Naeem, who was onsite and quickly opened the gate. There was no admission fee and Naeem insisted on providing me with a guided tour which was very informative.  At the end of the tour, I was handed a refreshingly cold apple juice by his assistant – Fazad.

Al Hada

The M80 climbs into the Sarawat mountains from Mecca to the mountain resort of Al Hada.

The M80 climbs into the Sarawat mountains from Mecca to the mountain resort of Al Hada.

After leaving Mecca, the main highway (M80) enters the spectacular Sarawat mountains, climbing 1,981 metres (6,500 feet) in 21 km through 93 tight bends.

Formed by plate tectonics, and home to the highest peaks in the Kingdom, the Sarawat mountains runs along the western edge of Saudi Arabia, with the eastern side gently sloping into the interior of the country while the western side descends dramatically onto a coastal plain which extends to the Red Sea.

At 4.5 km in length, the Taif Cable car is the longest in the Middle East.

At 4.5 km in length, the Taif Cable car is the longest in the Middle East.

Perched on top of the Sarawat range, at an elevation of 1,975 metres (6,479 feet), the town of Al Hada (means ‘The Tranquillity’) is a popular resort town within Makkah Province. Offering numerous hotels, restaurants and amusements, the highlight of Al Hada is the Taif Cable car which connects Al Hada with a water park, which is located in the lower village of Al-Kurr.

Known locally as the Telefric, the cable car, which departs from the Ramada hotel in Al Hada, covers a distance of 4.5 km with the journey in each direction lasting 30 minutes and a return ticket costing SAR 80.

Taif

The best views of Taif are from the revolving restaurant, which is located on the 29th floor of the Awaliv International Hotel.

The best views of Taif are from the revolving restaurant, which is located on the 29th floor of the Awaliv International Hotel.

Located in the Sarawat mountains, at 1,700 metres above sea level, Taif (population: 580,000) has always served as the summer capital for the Saudi Royal family. With its temperate climate, the city is refreshingly cool compared to most other places in Saudi Arabia.

The city lies within Mecca province and draws hordes of Saudi tourists, who come to relax in the cool climate, explore the many parks of the city, hike in the surrounding mountains and enjoy the many amusement parks, which can be found along the highway between Al Hada and Taif.

Taif's famous rose is an oil-rich 30-petal damask rose whose perfume of Arabia is powerful and robust.

Taif’s famous rose is an oil-rich 30-petal damask rose whose perfume of Arabia is powerful and robust.

Taif is renowned for its agriculture, pomegranates, grapes and roses – not just any rose but a powerful oil-rich, 30-petal, damask rose which is used to make a famous local perfume.

It’s believed the rose was first introduced into the area by the Ottomans from the Balkan region, the rose is apparently very similar to a famous Bulgarian variety. The rose business is big in Taif, with numerous shops pedalling the fragrant perfume. Each year, during the rose harvest (May to July), the city plays host to the Taif Rose Festival. If you wish to see how the roses are processed, the best place in town is the Al Gadhi Rose Factory.

Shubra Palace 

The most dazzling building in Taif, the Shubra Palace once served as a Royal residence.

The most dazzling building in Taif, the Shubra Palace once served as a Royal residence.

Most buildings in Taif could be described as modern and ugly, however, rising up out of the architectural bleakness is the beautiful Shubra Palace which once served as a Royal residence. Originally built in 1905, the Palace was once used as a residence by King Abdul Aziz and King Faisal but now serves as the city’s museum.

At the time of my visit the museum was closed for renovation and I was advised by the director, who invited me into his office to join him for tea, that the museum will be closed for at least the next 6 months, and maybe longer. No doubt the interior is resplendent but for now, the beautiful exterior, with its ornate latticework windows and balconies, can be admired from the street.

Al Rudaf Park

Al Rudaf Park in Taif is renown for its large piles of granite boulders which are a landscape gardener's dream.

Al Rudaf Park in Taif is renown for its large piles of granite boulders which are a landscape gardener’s dream.

Located on the southern outskirts of town, Al Rudaf Park is possibly the best park in a city which boasts many fine green spaces. This large, sprawling park is located in a dessert landscape which features mounds of large granite boulders. The landscape gardeners have woven a green park, pathways, a large water feature and various restaurants around the giant mounds.

The park is especially popular in the evening when families throng to enjoy the cool air, occasional fireworks and entertainment options.

Riyadh

Also known as 'The bottle-opener', the 302-metre Kingdom Centre dominates the Riyadh skylines.

Also known as ‘The bottle-opener’, the 302-metre Kingdom Centre dominates the Riyadh skylines.

Al Masmak Fortress

Al Masmak fort in Riyadh played a major part in the kingdom's history, being the first place to be conquered by King Abdulaziz.

Al Masmak fort in Riyadh played a major part in the kingdom’s history, being the first place to be conquered by King Abdulaziz.

Located in the historic district of Riyadh, Al Masmak Fortress is a clay and mud-brick fort, with four watchtowers, which was built in 1865 under the reign of Mohammed ibn Abdullah ibn Rasheed, a Saudi ruler who had, earlier, wrestled control of Riyadh from the Al Saud clan.

Detail of one of the doorways at Al Masmak fortress.

Detail of one of the doorways at Al Masmak fortress.

In 1902, the exiled Amir, Abdulaziz bin Abdul Rahman bin Faisal Al Saud, returned from Kuwait to his ancestral hometown, Riyadh, and led a siege on the fortress. Using a small army of men, he was able to overthrow the small garrison in what has become known as the ‘Battle of Riyadh‘. It was a significant victory. From Riyadh, Ibn Saud went on to conquer the different kingdoms of the region, before eventually uniting them to form what is now the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Plaster work on one of the courtyard walls at Al Masmak fortress.

Plaster work on one of the courtyard walls at Al Masmak fortress.

The fortress (open every day except Friday) serves as a museum, with various diwans (living rooms) converted to display exhibits which include maps and photographs of Saudi Arabia from 1912 to 1937.

Deera Square 

There is just one drain in the middle of Deera square. The building in the background is the headquarters of the 'Mutawwa', Saudi Arabia's religious police.

There is just one drain in the middle of Deera square. The building in the background is the headquarters of the ‘Mutawwa’, Saudi Arabia’s religious police.

Located alongside Al Masmak fortress is Deera Square which is a seemingly normal, almost pleasant public space – until you consider its alternate name – Chop Chop square.

It is here that public executions (be-headings) take place after Friday noon prayers, when police, and other officials, clear the area in the centre of the square to make way for executions to take place. After the beheading of the condemned, the head is stitched to the body which is wrapped up and taken away for the final rites.

At one end of the square, a beige-brick building serves as the headquarters of the ‘Mutawwa‘, Saudi Arabia’s religious police. Once powerful, the Mutawwa have largely been confined to barracks under the rule of MbS.

Installed for an upcoming event in Deera square, this 'service feedback' console seems to be poorly placed. I wonder how the condemned would have rated the service received?  

Installed for an upcoming event in Deera square, this ‘service feedback’ console seems to be poorly placed. I wonder how the condemned would have rated the service received?

What’s it like to be a state executioner in Saudi Arabia? You can read an interview with an executioner here

National Museum

The National Museum of Saudi Arabia provides a comprehensive overview of all things 'Saudi'.

The National Museum of Saudi Arabia provides a comprehensive overview of all things ‘Saudi’.

Located a short drive from Al Masmak fortress, the National Museum of Saudi Arabia is the largest museum in the country. Displays covering the history, culture, fauna and flora of the Kingdom are arranged over two floors, with the second floor devoted mostly to the history and development of Islam.

If you’re interested in gaining an overview of what the country has to offer, in terms of sights and history, the museum makes for a great first stop.

A ceramic calligraphy display at the National Museum of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh.

A ceramic calligraphy display at the National Museum of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh.

Kingdom Centre