Author - Darren McLean

Comoros Photo Gallery

Despite the entire island being covered in black volcanic lava, there are plenty of white sand beaches on Grand Comore.

Comoros Photo Gallery

This is an Comoros Photo Gallery from taste2travel.

To read about this destination, please refer to my Comoros Travel Guide.


All images are copyright! If you wish to purchase any images for commercial use, please contact me via the Contact page.


 

 


About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel.

I’ve been travelling the world for 36 years and, 233 countries and territories, and seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact me via the contact page.

I hope you this gallery and my website.

Safe travels!

Darren


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Comoros Travel Guide

A view of Lac Salé, where the water colour fluctuates between blue, brown and green.

Comoros Travel Guide

This is a Comoros Travel Guide from taste2travel.com

Date Visited: February 2024

Introduction

Tucked away in the azure waters of the Indian Ocean, off the coast of east Africa, the Comoros Islands beckon travellers with their untouched beauty and captivating allure.

An octopus collector on Grand Comore, hunting for octopus at low tide.

An octopus collector on Grand Comore, hunting for octopus at low tide.

Largely undeveloped and totally off the tourist radar, this unknown and hidden archipelago is a tapestry of volcanic landscapes, vibrant culture, and warm hospitality, waiting to be discovered.

The Comoros Islands, consisting of Grande Comore, Mohéli, Anjouan, and Mayotte, each offer a unique charm waiting to be explored.

The French administered Mayotte separately from the remainder of the Comoros beginning in 1975, when the three northernmost and predominantly Muslim islands of the Comoros declared independence, and the Muslim and Christian inhabitants of Mayotte chose to remain with France.


Mayotte Travel Guide

Mayotte, which is the most easterly of the four islands of the Comoran archipelago, is an overseas department of France, which is still claimed by the government of Comoros.

Having an outpost of the European Union located in close proximity to one of the poorest countries on the planet ensures that Mayotte is beset by a plethora of social issues which are the result of numerous Comoran refugees who travel illegally to the island by boat.   

You can read more about this French outpost in my Mayotte Travel Guide.


The main island. Grande Comore, is home to the capital, Moroni, and the only international airport in the country.

The island is dominated by the towering Mount Karthala (2,361 metre / 7,746 feet), an active volcano which occasionally erupts, covering the island in jet-black lava boulders.

A view of Maloudja Beach on Grand Comore.

A view of Maloudja Beach on Grand Comore.

In between the black lava flows lie stunning, white sand beaches, which are lapped by the azure waters of the Indian Ocean.

Comoros is a true paradise which still remains largely undeveloped. While the neighbouring island nations of Seychelles and Mauritius have fine-tuned their tourism offering, tourism remains undeveloped on Comoros. There are just five hotels listed on Booking.com on the main island of Grande Comore.

Comoros is home to many large Baobab trees.

Comoros is home to many large Baobab trees.

Beyond the natural beauty of the islands lies the heart of the Comoros – its people.

Comoros is a safe and welcoming destination.

The warm smiles of locals welcome you as you delve into the rich tapestry of Comorian culture, which has been influenced from centuries of trade with Africa, Arabia and Asia.

Despite the entire island being covered in black volcanic lava, there are plenty of white sand beaches on Grand Comore.

Despite the entire island being covered in black volcanic lava, there are plenty of white sand beaches on Grand Comore.

The Comoros Islands offer an authentic Indian Ocean travel experience that is as captivating as it is unforgettable.

It’s a destination which is ideal for intrepid travellers who seek to get off the well-worn tourist circuit, and of course for the country-counters who are determined to visit all 193 UN countries.


Location

The Comoros Islands are located about 320 km (200 mi) off the eastern coast of Africa, in close proximity to Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

An archipelago nation, the Comoros consist of four main islands.

  • Grande Comore
  • Mohéli
  • Anjouan
  • Mayotte (an overseas department of France, geographically part of the Comoros but politically distinct)
A view of Grande Comore Island, which is covered in black lava.

A view of Grande Comore Island, which is covered in black lava.

The islands are of volcanic origin, with Mount Karthala on Grande Comore being an active volcano and one of the tallest peaks in the Indian Ocean.

People

The people of the Comoros, known as Comorians (population: 820,000) are a diverse and culturally rich population with a unique ethnic blend of African, Arab, and Malagasy, which reflects the islands’ history of trade and settlement.

The official languages of the Comoros are Comorian, French, and Arabic. Comorian is widely spoken among the population, with different dialects spoken on each of the main islands.

Islam is the dominant religion in the Comoros, with the majority of Comorians adhering to Sunni Islam. The practice of Islam plays a central role in daily life, culture, and traditions.

Flag

The flag of the Comoros.

The flag of the Comoros.

The flag of Comoros was officially adopted on January 7, 2002, following a national referendum. The current design was chosen to better reflect the unity, history, and aspirations of the Comorian nation.

A souvenir Comoran flag.

A souvenir Comoran flag.

The flag design consists of a white crescent with four white five-pointed stars inside of a green triangle.

The flag has four stripes, representing the four main islands of the nation: yellow for Mohéli, white for Mayotte (a French department claimed by the Comoros), red for Anjouan and blue for Grande Comore.

The four stars on the flag also symbolise the four islands. The star and crescent, as well as the colour green on the flag, symbolise the main religion of the country – Islam.

Currency

The Comorian franc is the official currency of the Comoros.

The Comorian franc is the official currency of the Comoros.

The official currency of Comoros is the Comorian franc (FC), which has the currency code of KMF. 

The Comorian franc is issued and regulated by the Central Bank of the Comoros, which is the country’s central monetary authority.

It is used for all financial transactions within the country, including daily purchases, business transactions, and banking operations.

Credit cards are rarely accepted on the Comoros.  

A view of the obverse side of Comoran franc banknotes, which feature Arabic script.

A view of the obverse side of Comoran franc banknotes, which feature Arabic script.

Banknotes, which are printed by the Bank of France, are issued in denominations of  500 FC, 1,000 FC, 2,000 FC, 5,000 FC, 10,000 FC.

Coins are issued in denominations of 25 FC, 50 FC, 100 FC, 250 FC.

Credit Cards

In the few places on Comoros where credit cards are accepted, only Visa card is accepted.

In the few places on Comoros where credit cards are accepted, only Visa card is accepted.

Like so many countries in Africa, credit cards are rarely accepted on the Comoros. Cash is king!

This lack of credit card acceptance is due to the fact that 95% of Africans do not have a bank account and hence, do not own any plastic bank cards. All transactions are conducted in cash!

The only businesses which accept credit cards are a couple of the better hotels which deal with foreign tourists.

Throughout Comoros, whenever credit cards are accepted, only Visa card is accepted.

If you are using Mastercard, American Express or any other card, you will find your card is not accepted.

A very frustrating experience!

BFC bank in Moroni provides the one ATM in the Comoros which accepts Mastercard and American Express.

BFC bank in Moroni provides the one ATM in the Comoros which accepts Mastercard and American Express.

The one lifeline, for non-Visa card holders, is the single ATM which is installed at the Moroni branch of Banque Fédérale des Commerce (BFC), which is the main commercial bank on the Comoros Islands.

Because they are the main business bank for the country, they feel it is appropriate that they accept all major credit cards.

The only ATMs on Grand Comore are located in downtown Moroni.

There are no ATMs at the airport. It is essential to arrive on the Comoros with either EUR or USD cash!

Costs

Travel costs on Comoros are the highest of any country in eastern Africa! 

Sample costs: 

  • Cappuccino? – I found nowhere on Comoros which offered barista-made coffee.
  • Can of Coke/ Sprite: €1.50
  • Small bottled water: €0.50
  • Imported Beer: €7.50
  • Meal at a mid-range restaurant: €10
  • Meal at the Golden Tulip Hotel: €15
  • Hotel room at the Golden Tulip Hotel: €130
  • Daytrip tour with Adore Comore tour company: €80 per person (minimum of 2 people)

Tour Companies

My guide, from Adore Comore, at Lac Salé.

My guide, from Adore Comore, at Lac Salé.

While on Grand Comore, I toured the island with an excellent guide from the Adore Comore tour company.

The company offers a range of daytrips which are priced from €80 per person (minimum 2 pax).

As a single pax, I had to pay €160 for a day trip which makes for an expensive outing.

During our day trip, our car suffered a punctured tire which was not surprising considering the terrible condition of the roads.

During our day trip, our car suffered a punctured tire which was not surprising considering the terrible condition of the roads.

Sightseeing

Grand Comore, also known as Ngazidja, is the largest and most populous island in the Comoros archipelago. It offers a diverse range of sights and attractions for visitors to explore.

The island is dominated by Mount Karthala, an active shield volcano and the highest point in the Comoros. It stands at approximately 2,361 metres (7,746 feet) above sea level.

Moroni

A view of Moroni harbour and the historic Friday Mosque.

A view of Moroni harbour and the historic Friday Mosque.

Moroni, the capital of the Comoros, lies in the shadow of Mount Karthala, on the west coast of Grand Comore.

The iconic view of Moroni is of the (heavily polluted) harbour and the Friday Mosque (Mosquée de Vendredi), which was constructed in 1427, without a minaret. It wasn’t until 1921 that a minaret was finally added.

As the main commercial centre on the Comoros, chaotic Moroni is home to a bustling market.

Lac Salé (Salt Lake)

A view of Lac Salé, where the water colour fluctuates between blue, brown and green.

A view of Lac Salé, where the water colour fluctuates between blue, brown and green.

A highlight of Grand Comore is Lac Salé, or Salt Lake, a unique geological formation located on the north coast of Grand Comore.

The lake’s high salinity creates striking contrasts of colors, with the water colour fluctuating (throughout the day) between blue, brown and green.

The colour of the lake water contrasts strongly with the turquoise waters of the adjacent Indian Ocean.

Dos du Dragon

"Dos du Dragon,” or the dragon’s back, looks like a mythical creature, resting by the sea.

“Dos du Dragon,” or the dragon’s back, looks like a mythical creature, resting by the sea.

Located a short drive beyond the Salt Lake, Dos du Dragon, or the “dragon’s back” is a rocky protrusion jutting out into the Indian Ocean.

Mitsamiouli Beach

A view of beautiful Mitsamiouli Beach.

A view of beautiful Mitsamiouli Beach.

Located on the northwest coast of Grande Comore, beautiful Mitsamiouli Beach is home to a pretty stretch of white-sand, surrounded by black volcanic lava and backed by a line of palm trees.

A Comoran family, enjoying a day out at Mitsamiouli Beach.

A Comoran family, enjoying a day out at Mitsamiouli Beach.

The government of Qatar, through the Qatar National Hotels Company, is currently building a new beachside resort in Mitsamiouli.

For this reason, the road between the airport and Mitsamiouli has been completely resurfaced and is currently the best road anywhere in the Comoros.

Sada Beach

A view of Sada Beach at low tide.

A view of Sada Beach at low tide.

Sada Beach is home to a small community of expat holiday houses.

Most of the large homes that line the coast are boarded up since most of the residents are only in-country for a few weeks at a time.

Giant Baobab Tree

The giant Baobab tree.

The giant Baobab tree.

Located near the airport, a huge, hollow, Baobab tree makes for an interesting stop while driving along the west coast.

My guide, from Adore Comoros, providing a sense of scale for this giant Baobab tree.

My guide, from Adore Comoros, providing a sense of scale for this giant Baobab tree.

A large opening at the base of the tree allows access into a lofty, hollow, chamber which provides an interesting perspective on the world.

A view inside the hollow of the giant Baobab tree.

A view inside the hollow of the giant Baobab tree.

Accommodation

There is a very limited number of accommodation options on the Comoros, with bookimg.com listing just 5 properties on Grande Comore.

Golden Tulip Hotel

The Golden Tulip Hotel offers the best accommodation on the Comoros.

The Golden Tulip Hotel offers the best accommodation on the Comoros.

The only international chain hotel on the Comoros is the Golden Tulip Hotel which offers the best accommodation in the country.

The hotel is located on the west coast of Grande Comore, 10 km south of the airport and 10 km north of the capital, Moroni.

A public taxi from the airport to the hotel costs 5,000 KMF (€10) while the hotel charges 15,000 KMF (€30) for an airport shuttle.

Apart from its comfortable rooms, the hotel offers a very good restaurant which attracts both guests and visiting locals who come for all sorts of functions and events.

The hotel offers the best restaurant on the island and the only conference/ meeting room facilities, which ensures a steady stream of corporate guests.

My spacious and comfortable room at the Golden Tulip Hotel, Comoros.

My spacious and comfortable room at the Golden Tulip Hotel, Comoros.

A standard room on booking.com costs around US$130 with payment options at the hotel limited to cash or Visa credit card.

The hotel does not accept Mastercard or American Express.

One way to stay at the hotel, and pay with any credit card, is to book a room through expedia.com and select the option to ‘Pay in Advance‘. This will allow you to pay with any credit card via Expedia.

The hotel offers spacious and comfortable, albeit slightly dated, rooms which overlook the palm-tree studded garden and unbeatable views of the Indian Ocean.

A view of the garden, and the Indian Ocean, from my room at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

A view of the garden, and the Indian Ocean, from my room at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

The hotel also features its own private beach and a family of giant tortoises which act as lawn mowers, gradually grazing their way around the hotel lawn.

The lawn at the Golden Tulip Hotel is kept in good order thanks to a family of grazing tortoises.

The lawn at the Golden Tulip Hotel is kept in good order thanks to a family of grazing tortoises.


Reverse Money Exchange:

Comoran francs cannot be exchanged outside of the country and it can be difficult to change excess francs back into hard currency at the end of your trip. 

I was able to exchange excess francs, for both EUR and USD, at the reception desk at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

A great service for departing guests.    


Hôtel La Grillade

A view of the Hôtel La Grillade, which is located a short drive north of Moroni.

A view of the Hôtel La Grillade, which is located a short drive north of Moroni.

Also located on the west coast, 1 km north of Moroni, the mid-range Hôtel La Grillade offers very average rooms for about €80 per night.

I would rate the hotel as 1-2 stars and not worth the money that is being charged.

Payment is either cash or Visa card only! 

The hotel has a decent restaurant which offers reasonable food.

A public taxi from the airport to the hotel costs 5,000 KMF (€10) while the hotel charges 10,000 KMF (€20) for an airport shuttle.

Eating Out

Every day at low tide, hordes of locals search for octopus in tidal rock pools.

Every day at low tide, hordes of locals search for octopus in tidal rock pools.

The cuisine of Comoros reflects influences from Africa, Arabia, Madagascar and beyond. As can be expected on an island nation, seafood dominates the diet with fish, octopus and lobster especially popular.

Golden Tulip Hotel

Breakfast, with a view of the Indian Ocean, at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

Breakfast, with a view of the Indian Ocean, at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

The outdoor, ocean-front, restaurant at the Golden Tulip Hotel is one of the most popular restaurants on Grande Comore.

The best breakfast, anywhere on Grande Comore, is served on the balcony of the restaurant, with a front-row seat overlooking the azure waters of the Indian Ocean.

A delicious, seared-tuna, salad, served at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

A delicious, seared-tuna, salad, served at the Golden Tulip Hotel.

Specialties include lobster and a very tasty seared-tuna salad which is made from freshly caught tuna.

Hotel La Grillade

The restaurant menu at the Hotel La Grillade features locally caught lobster, which is very affordable at €12.

The restaurant menu at the Hotel La Grillade features locally caught lobster, which is very affordable at €12.

While the rooms at Hotel La Grillade are very average, the food served in the restaurant by the friendly staff is anything but average!

Their lobster meal, which costs just €12, is an absolute bargain.

I also recommend their fillet steak, which is served with a creamy pepper sauce! Delicious!

Highly recommended!

Sada Beach Restaurant

My lunch stop at Sada Beach during a trip to the north of Grande Comore.

My lunch stop at Sada Beach during a trip to the north of Grande Comore.

During a trip to the north coast of Grande Comore with Adore Comoros, I had lunch at a rustic beachfront restaurant at Sada Beach.

My tasty, and spicy, freshly caught, tuna curry lunch at Sada Beach.

My tasty, and spicy, freshly caught, tuna curry lunch at Sada Beach.

Owned by a Comoran couple, the husband used to work as a chef in a nearby resort, until the resort closed.

I was treated to a beautiful tuna curry with salad, rice, plantains and more. Very nice!

Visa Requirements

My Comoros Visa-on-Arrival (VOA) which was issued without fuss at Moroni International Airport.

My Comoros Visa-on-Arrival (VOA) which was issued without fuss at Moroni International Airport.

The Visa Policy of Comoros is wonderfully simple.

All nationalities require a visa which can be purchased on arrival at Moroni International Airport.

Visas cost €30, or US$50, for stays of up to 45 days.

Free of charge visas are issued to transit visitors with a stay for a maximum of 24 hours

All visitors must hold a passport valid for 6 months and return or onward tickets.

My visa was issued, without fuss, by friendly immigration officers in about 10-minutes.

Getting There

Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) to Moroni, via Dar es Salaam (Tanzania).

Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) to Moroni, via Dar es Salaam (Tanzania).

Air

All visitors arrive at Moroni International Airport, aka Prince Said Ibrahim International Airport (IATA: HAH), the only international gateway to the Comoros.

The airport is located on the west coast of Grande Comore, 20 km (12 mi) north of Moroni.

The following airlines provide service to/ from Moroni:

  • Air Austral – flies to/from Saint-Denis de la Réunion
  • Air Madagascar – flies to/from Antananarivo, Majunga
  • Air Tanzania – flies to/from Dar es Salaam
  • Egyptair – flies to/from Cairo, Dar es Salaam
  • Ethiopian Airlines – flies to/from Addis Ababa, Dar es Salaam
  • Ewa Air – flies to/from Dzaoudzi
  • Kenya Airways – flies to/from Nairobi–Jomo Kenyatta
  • Precision Air – flies to/from Anjouan, Dar es Salaam

Airport Transport

Most hotels provide airport shuttle services, although they charge from €20-30.

Taxis meet all flights with a ride into Moroni costing €10 (5,000 KMF).

Getting Around

Roads on Comoros are generally diabolical.

Roads on Comoros are generally diabolical.

Public transport on Comoros consists of shared taxis which charge around 500 – 1,000 KMF for trips along the west coast.

Taxis, which are old, dirty and in poor condition can be hailed on the side of the road.

A Comoran License plate.

A Comoran License plate.

Roads on the island are in terrible condition with no investment being made in infrastructure at any stage since independence was gained in in 1975.


That’s the end of my Comoros Travel Guide.

If you wish to comment on this guide or contact me, you can do so using the comment form below or via the ‘Contact’ page.

Safe Travels!
Darren


Further Reading

Following is a list of my travel content from the region:

 

Travel Quiz 71: World Map Quiz

World Globes

World Map Quiz

This is a World Map quiz from taste2travel!

 

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Test your knowledge with this World Map Quiz from taste2travel.

 

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Travel Quiz 71: World Map Quiz
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Travel Quiz 70: Commonwealth Country Flags Quiz

Commonwealth Country Flags Quiz

This is a Commonwealth Country Flags Quiz from taste2travel!

How well do you know your Commonwealth country flags?

 

Are you a true vexillologist?

 

Test your knowledge with this Commonwealth Flags quiz from taste2travel. 

 

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01. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

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The design of the flag of Namibia consists of a white-edged red diagonal band, creating two triangles - the upper blue triangle is charged with a yellow sun with 12 rays, and a lower green triangle. The sun is to represent life and energy, red for heroism of the people and their determination to build a future of equal opportunity. Green is for agricultural resources, blue is for the sky and the ocean, white for peace and unity.

02. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

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The design of the flag of Uganda consists of two sets of black, yellow and red horizontal bands. The black is for the African people, yellow for the African sunshine, and red being the colour of the African brotherhood - being the colour of blood, through which all African people are connected. In the centre of the field is a white disc charged with the national emblem, which is a grey crowned crane, facing the hoist side. The cranes raised leg is for the forward movement of the country.

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Flag of Canada.
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The flag of Canada consists of a red field with a white square at its centre, positioned inside which is an 11 pointed red maple leaf. Due to this distinctive design feature, the Canadian flag is sometimes referred to colloquially as the "Maple Leaf".

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Although Rwanda never had any historical ties to the United Kingdom, it chose to join the Commonwealth of Nations in 2009 to take advantage of the diplomatic and economic ties that membership would bring. This Rwandan flag design consists of a tri-colour of blue, yellow and green, with the blue stripe being the widest and the yellow and green of equal size. The blue stripe is charged with a yellow sun situated in the upper right corner of the fly side. Symbolically, the blue band is for happiness and peace, the yellow band economic development and the yellow sun for enlightenment. The lower green band is for the hope of prosperity. The design of the Rwandan flag was adopted in 2001 and was chosen to avoid any connotations to the genocide in 1994. The new design as a whole is said to represent national unity, respect for work, confidence in the future and heroism.

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The design of the flag of Sierra Leone is a tri-colour of green, white and blue with the green symbolising the country's natural resources, agriculture and the mountains. White is for unity and justice, and blue is for the harbour of Freetown, the Capital city of Sierra Leone.

06. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

New Zealand Flag
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This design of the New Zealand flag was adopted in 1902 and consists of a blue field with a Union Jack in the upper left corner of the hoist side (the Canton) and 4 red stars, bordered with white on the fly side of the flag - these are based on the Southern Cross. The stars of the Southern Cross represent the country's location in the South Pacific Ocean while the Union Jack recognises NZ's historical origins as a British colony.

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When Belize became Independent in 1981, this flag design was adopted. The Belize flag consists of a blue background, red borders top and bottom, and Coat of Arms in the middle. The Coat of Arms is said to represent the logging industry that first lead the British to settle there. The colours represent the country's national parties, the red being added after the United Democrats Party objected to the flag only being blue and white originally as that was the People's United Party's representatives colours.

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Although Mozambique never had any historical ties to the United Kingdom, it chose to join the Commonwealth of Nations in 1995 to take advantage of the diplomatic and economic ties that membership would bring. This flag of Mozambique was adopted in 1983 and consists of a tri-colour flag of green, black and yellow stripes edged with white. On the hoist side there is an isosceles triangle in red with a yellow star in the centre. Superimposed on the star is an AK-47 with a bayonet attached to the barrel crossed over a farming mattock over an open book. Green stands for the riches of the land, the white edging for peace. Black is for the African continent, yellow for the countries mineral and red the struggle for independence. The rifle stands for defense and vigilance, the open book for the importance of education, the hoe represents the country's agriculture. The star symbolises Marxism and internationalism.

09. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

United Kingdom Flag
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An iconic flag - the Union Jack consists of the red cross of Saint George (patron saint of England, which also represents Wales), edged in white, superimposed on the saltire of Saint Patrick (patron saint of Ireland), also edged in white, which are superimposed on the saltire of Saint Andrew (patron saint of Scotland). Wales is not represented in the Union Flag by Wales's patron saint, Saint David, because the flag was designed whilst Wales was part of the Kingdom of England.

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The Zambian flag's colours and emblems are rich in symbolism. Each of the four colours represents an aspect of Zambia: green for the country's natural resources and vegetation; red for its struggle for freedom; black for its people and orange for its mineral wealth (primarily copper). The eagle is an African fish eagle, which also appears in the national coat of arms and represents the people's ability to rise above the nation's problems.

11. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Correct! Wrong!

The Tanzania flag was adopted in 1964 when Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged and the current flag design was created to replace the two individual flags. This design incorporates elements of both of the former flags - it consists of a black diagonal stripe edged in yellow, dividing the upper green triangle from the lower blue triangle. The green represents the natural vegetation and agricultural resources of the country. The black is to represent the Swahili people who are native to Tanzania. The blue is for the Indian ocean and numerous lakes and rivers of the land. The thin yellow stripes represent the mineral wealth of Tanzania.

12. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Correct! Wrong!

The colours of the flag of the Bahamas carry cultural, political, and regional meanings. The gold alludes the shining sun – as well as other key land-based natural resources – while the aquamarine epitomises the water surrounding the country. The black symbolises the vigour, and force of the Bahamian people, while the directed triangle evokes their "enterprising and determined" nature to cultivate the abundant natural resources on the land and in the sea.

13. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

The flag of Guyana.
Correct! Wrong!

This current design of the Guyana flag was adopted in 1966 and is known as the 'golden arrowhead'. This design came about when Guyana became independent from the United Kingdom. The design consists of a green field with a black edged red isosceles triangle based on the hoist side, on top of a larger yellow triangle with a white border. The symbolism of the colours of the Guyana flag are as follows - green for the agricultural and forests, white for many rivers of the country. Gold for the mineral wealth, red for zeal and sacrifice in nation-building, and black represents perseverance.

14. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Correct! Wrong!

The design of the flag of South Africa consists of a horizontal red stripe on the top, and an equal blue stripe on the bottom. These stripes are divided by a green band running towards the hoist side of the flag, where it splits into a wide horizontal Y shape. The green band is bordered by thin white stripes running along the top and bottoms sides. Inside the Y shape is a black isosceles triangle edged with narrow yellow stripes. The colours themselves are noted to 'not have any essential meaning' however the colours come from different sources. Black green and yellow are from the African National Congress while the blue white and red are found in both the former flag of South Africa and the flag of the United Kingdom.

15. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Tonga Flag
Correct! Wrong!

The colours and symbols of the Tongan flag carry cultural, political, and regional meanings. The red cross alludes to Christianity, the religion practiced by approximately 97% of the country's population. It is one of 28 national flags to contain overtly Christian symbols. The white epitomizes purity, while the red evokes the sacrifice of the Blood of Christ, which was shed during the Crucifixion.

16. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Antigua and Barbuda Flag
Correct! Wrong!

This flag was adopted after a competition was held in 1967 to design a new flag, to mark the achievement of self-government. The colours of the Antigua and Barbuda flag represent different elements, with the yellow, blue and white standing for the sea, the sun and the sand, while the black and red represent the African ancestry of the people, and red for energy or the life of the people. The blue also represents the Caribbean sea, while the V shape of the design represents Victory.

17. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Correct! Wrong!

The Malawi flag design consists of a horizontal tri-band of black, red and green stripes. The black stripe has a red rising sun with 31 rays. Symbolically, the 31 rays represent that Malawi was the 31st African nation at the time to gain independence. The black is for the indigenous people of the land, red for the blood of their struggle and green to represent nature.

18. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Singapore Flag
Correct! Wrong!

The red field on the Singapore flag symbolises "universal fellowship and equality", while the white filed symbolises "pervading and everlasting purity and virtue". The crescent moon represents a "young nation on the ascendant". The five stars stand for the nation's ideals of "democracy, peace, progress, justice and equality". The crescent symbol is also seen by the nation's Muslim activists to represent Islam.

19. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Pakistan Flag
Correct! Wrong!

The Islamic green of the flag of Pakistan represents the Muslim-majority populace of Pakistan while the white stripe on the hoist-end represents its various religious minorities i.e. Non-Muslims, such as Hindus, Christians, Sikhs, Zoroastrians and others. The combined star and crescent serve as a symbol of Islam, with the crescent representing progress and the five-pointed star representing light and knowledge. The flag symbolises Pakistan's commitment to both Islam as well as the rights of religious minorities.

20. This is the flag of which Commonwealth country?

Seychelles Flag
Correct! Wrong!

The flag of the Seychelles consists of five different coloured bands (blue, yellow, red, white, and green) starting from one end and diverging towards the other end. The oblique bands symbolise a dynamic new country moving into the future. The colour blue depicts the sky and the sea that surrounds the Seychelles. Yellow is for the sun which gives light and life, red symbolises the people and their determination to work for the future in unity and love, while the white band represents social justice and harmony. The green depicts the land and natural environment.

Travel Quiz 70: Commonwealth Country Flags Quiz
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Niue Photo Gallery

Limu pools offers magical snorkeling.

Niue Photo Gallery

This is an Niue Photo Gallery from taste2travel.

To read about this destination, please refer to my Niue Travel Guide.


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About taste2travel!

Hi! My name is Darren McLean, the owner of taste2travel.

I’ve been travelling the world for 36 years and, 230 countries and territories, and seven continents later, I’m still on the road.

Taste2travel offers travel information for destinations around the world, specialising in those that are remote and seldom visited. I hope you enjoy my content!

Ever since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the idea of travel. I started planning my first overseas trip at the age of 19 and departed Australia soon after my 20th birthday. Many years later, I’m still on the road.

In 2016, I decided to document and share my journeys and photography with a wider audience and so, taste2travel.com was born.

My aim is to create useful, usable travel guides/ reports on destinations I have visited. My reports are very comprehensive and detailed as I believe more information is better than less. They are best suited to those planning a journey to a particular destination.

Many of the destinations featured on my website are far off the regular beaten tourist trail. Often, these countries are hidden gems which remain undiscovered, mostly because they are remote and difficult to reach. I enjoy exploring and showcasing these ‘off-the-radar’ destinations, which will, hopefully, inspire others to plan their own adventure to a far-flung corner of the planet.

I’m also a fan of travel trivia and if you are too, you’ll find plenty of travel quizzes on the site.

Photography has always been a passion and all the photos appearing in these galleries were taken by me.

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Niue Travel Guide

Niue Travel Guide

This is a Niue Travel Guide from taste2travel.com

Date Visited: December 2023

Introduction

Affectionally known as ‘The Rock’, the tiny Pacific Ocean island of Niue is a charming, remote, off-the-beaten track destination.

A raised limestone reef with no beaches, but plenty of cliffs and reef, Niue is affectionally known as ‘The Rock’.

A raised limestone reef with no beaches, but plenty of cliffs and reef, Niue is affectionally known as ‘The Rock’.

With a small and friendly population of 1,620 Polynesians, tiny Niue is full of surprises. The name Niue (pronounced ‘Noo-ay‘) translates as ‘behold the coconut’.

A raised slab of limestone reef, the profile of Niue is similar to that of a ‘top hat’, with sheer cliffs rising up 20 metres from the sea, forming the sides of the hat.

Colourful Niuean design.

Colourful Niuean design.

The top of the hat is a large flat plateau, while the ‘rim’ of the hat is a fringing reef which surrounds the entire island. There are just a few places where narrow channels through the reef allow locals to access the sea.

Niue is entirely surrounded by a fringing reef.

Niue is entirely surrounded by a fringing reef.

The entire population lives on the plateau, with everyone living along the coast, while the empty interior of the island is uninhabited and occupied by forest and taro fields.

Niue Blue! Another perfect day in paradise!

Niue Blue! Another perfect day in paradise!

A 62 km (38 mi) ring road around the coast links all of the island’s communities. Two cross-island roads link the west and east coast, a drive of just 19 km (12 mi).

Artwork in Alofi.

Artwork in Alofi.

Most of population lives on the west coast (the leeward side of the island), in and around the main town, and administrative centre of Alofi.

The east coast (the windward side of the island) is sparsely populated, being home to a few sleepy villages.

A hidden gem - tiny Tamakautoga Beach is one of the few beaches on Niue.

A hidden gem – tiny Tamakautoga Beach is one of the few beaches on Niue.

Being surrounded by a fringing reef, Niue lacks the sandy beaches which might otherwise attract the tourist hordes. However, what the island lacks in beaches, it makes up for in other ways.

A view of Talava Arch, a highlight of Niue.

A view of Talava Arch, a highlight of Niue.

The entire coast is lined with dramatic limestone caves, chasms, arches and other geological wonders.

Well maintained sea tracks provide access to turquoise-blue swimming holes where a rich array of tropical fish can be found. There are many snorkeling opportunities on the island.

Close to the shore, the water depth is around 50 metres, while a few kilometres from shore, the water depth is 2,000 metres.

Close to the shore, the water depth is around 50 metres, while a few kilometres from shore, the water depth is 2,000 metres.

Beyond the reef, the island slopes away quickly, with water depths ranging from 50 m (165 ft) near the shore, to a depth of over 2,000 m (6,560 ft) within a few kilometres of shore.

Scuba Diving conditions on Niue are perfect! With an absence of sand and a lack of rivers on the island, there is nothing that disturbs the incredible clarity of the sea water. Water visibility is excellent up to 85 metres.

With excellent underwater visibility, Niue is a scuba diver's paradise.

With excellent underwater visibility, Niue is a scuba diver’s paradise.

There is one scuba diving shop on the island – the excellent and professional Niue Blue. I did a 2-tank dive with them which was a highlight of my trip. For more information, please refer to the ‘Scuba Diving‘ section below.

Enjoying scuba diving on Niue with Niue Blue.

Enjoying scuba diving on Niue with Niue Blue.

While not a cheap destination (please refer to the ‘Costs‘ section below for more information), Niue is a charming, surprising and engaging destination.

With a small and friendly local population, this tiny island will surprise and delight with all it offers.

A view of the north coast of Niue at Uluvehi.

A view of the north coast of Niue at Uluvehi.

In just over 3-hours flying time from Auckland, New Zealand, visitors to Niue will find themselves transported to another world. With its Jurassic-like geological formations and crystal-clear waters, Niue is like no other destination!

Highly recommended!

Location

Niue is a small island nation located in the South Pacific Ocean. It is situated about 2,400 kilometres (about 1,500 miles) northeast of New Zealand, within the triangle formed by the Cook Islands, Tonga, and Samoa.

Niue is known as a raised coral atoll, and its terrain is characterized by limestone cliffs, caves, and a central plateau.

A view of the reef which completely encircles Niue.

A view of the reef which completely encircles Niue.

The island has a total land area of about 260 square kilometres (100 square miles).

The coastline features a fringing reef which is backed by rugged cliffs.

Not a place for a beach holiday, Niue is a raised limestone rock, completely surrounded by reef.

Not a place for a beach holiday, Niue is a raised limestone rock, completely surrounded by reef.

The capital and largest village is Alofi, located on the western coast of the island.

While Niue is a relatively small and isolated island, it is surrounded by the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean, making it a remote but scenically beautiful destination.

Sunset on Niue.

Sunset on Niue.

The island’s isolation and unique geography contribute to its distinct cultural and environmental characteristics.

A noticeboard on Niue illustrates cyclone intensity levels. Watch what happens to the tree at each level.

A noticeboard on Niue illustrates cyclone intensity levels. Watch what happens to the tree at each level.

Niue is located in the Pacific cyclone zone and has been battered by severe cyclones in the past.

In 2004, Cyclone Heta, a Category 5 cyclone, caused massive damage to Niue, with huge waves breaking on top of the (20 metre high) sea cliffs.

People

The 1,620 inhabitants of Niue are predominantly Polynesians.

The 1,620 inhabitants of Niue are predominantly Polynesians.

The people of Niue are known as Niueans. Home to a small, close-knit community of 1,620 souls, the population is, predominately, of Polynesian descent.

Due to its small population and close-knit community, social relationships are often tightly woven, and individuals often have multiple roles within the community.

Religion, particularly Christianity, is also an important aspect of Niuean life, and the majority of the population is affiliated with various Christian denominations.

Niueans are known for their warm hospitality and strong sense of community.

Colourful artwork adorns a small wooden building in Alofi.

Colourful artwork adorns a small wooden building in Alofi.

The culture places a high value on respect for elders and a communal approach to decision-making. Traditional customs and practices, such as dance, music, and art, play a significant role in Niuean life.

The Niuean language, closely related to other Polynesian languages, is an essential part of their cultural identity.

In recent years, Niue has faced challenges related to depopulation, with some Niueans migrating to New Zealand and other countries for better economic opportunities.

However, efforts are being made to preserve and promote Niuean culture and identity both on the island and within the diaspora.

Niuean Hiapo

Hiapo art work on display at the Niue Visitors Centre in Alofi.

Hiapo art work on display at the Niue Visitors Centre in Alofi.

Traditional bark cloth painting is something which is found throughout the islands of the south Pacific.

On Niue this lost art form, which is known locally as Hiapo, is being revived by Niuean artist Cora-Allan Wickliffe.

Hiapo art work on display at the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue.

Hiapo art work on display at the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue.

Examples of Hiapo art adorn the walls of the Niue Visitors Centre and the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue.

Flag

The flag of Niue.

The flag of Niue.

The flag of Niue was adopted on 15 October 1975. It consists of the Union Jack in the upper left corner with a star in the middle of the Union Jack and four stars forming a diamond around it.

It is very unusual for a flag based on a British ensign design, in having not only a yellow background, but also a defaced (edited) Union Jack in the canton.

The flag of Niue, flying on Niue.

The flag of Niue, flying on Niue.

The flag was designed by Patricia Rex, the wife of the then-Premier Robert Rex.

The design elements of the flag include the Union Jack, which symbolises the protection granted by the United Kingdom in 1900 after petitioning by the Kings and Chiefs of Niue.

The yellow field symbolises “the bright sunshine of Niue and the warm feelings of the Niuean people towards New Zealand and her people.”

The association with New Zealand, which took over responsibility and administration of Niue in 1901, is also represented by the four small stars that depict the Southern Cross.

The flag of Niue.

The flag of Niue.

Finally, the blue disc containing a larger star represents the deep blue sea surrounding the self-governing island of Niue

Currency

The official currency of Niue is the New Zealand Dollar (NZD).

The official currency of Niue is the New Zealand Dollar (NZD).

The official currency of Niue is the New Zealand Dollar (NZD). Niue does not have its own separate currency and has chosen to use the New Zealand Dollar as its official legal tender.

The colourful New Zealand dollar banknotes are printed on polymer.

The colourful New Zealand dollar banknotes are printed on polymer.

This arrangement is part of Niue’s status as a self-governing territory in free association with New Zealand.

As a result, the New Zealand Dollar is widely used for everyday transactions, and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand is responsible for issuing and regulating the currency in Niue. The coins and banknotes used in Niue are the same as those used in New Zealand.

Exchange Rates

The New Zealand dollar (NZD) is the official currency of Niue.

The New Zealand dollar (NZD) is the official currency of Niue.

As of December 2023, the exchange rate between the NZD and USD was:

$1 NZD = $0.60 USD

To check the current exchange rate, please click here.

Banking Services

There is just one bank on Niue – the Niue Development Bank.

The bank also serves as the one branch of the Niue Post Office.

ATMs

While there are no ATMs on Niue, cash can be accessed at the one branch of the Niue Development Bank in Alofi.

While there are no ATMs on Niue, cash can be accessed at the one branch of the Niue Development Bank in Alofi.

There are no ATMs on Niue, but you can withdraw cash at the one branch of the Niue Development Bank which is located in Alofi.

Credit Cards

Credit cards, such as MasterCard and Visa are widely accepted on Niue.

Most merchants on the island have EFTPOS terminals and prefer cashless payments.

Rarely did I need to use cash, however, it’s prudent to carry some cash from New Zealand for emergencies.

While your home bank will most likely charge you an ‘exchange’ fee for any overseas credit card transactions, businesses on Niue will additionally charge you a credit card usage fee, which is typically around 3-5% on each transaction.

Philately

The stamps of Niue are popular with philatelists around the world.

The stamps of Niue are popular with philatelists around the world.

Niue is known for issuing a variety of colourful  and thematic postage stamps.

Stamps are often issued to commemorate special occasions, anniversaries, and international events, making them not only a means of postage but also a form of cultural expression and representation for the people of Niue.

The stamps of Niue showcase local culture, history, fauna and flora.

The stamps of Niue showcase local culture, history, fauna and flora.

These stamps often feature unique designs that showcase the natural beauty, culture, history, and important events related to Niue.

The themes of Niuean stamps can vary widely, including marine life, endemic flora and fauna, cultural symbols, historical figures, and significant events.

The stamps of Niue feature scenes from this beautiful Pacific island.

The stamps of Niue feature scenes from this beautiful Pacific island.

Niue is part of the wider philatelic community and often collaborates with other countries on joint stamp issues. These joint issues may commemorate shared historical or cultural connections.

Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation

The office of the <i>Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation</i> (NPNC) is in a small shopping complex behind Swanson's supermarket.

The office of the Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation (NPNC) is in a small shopping complex behind Swanson’s supermarket.

While on the island, stamps can be purchased from either the one branch of Niue Post which is housed inside the Niue Development Bank branch in Alofi or from the Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation (NPNC), which is in a small shopping complex, behind Swanson’s supermarket.

Niue First Day Covers (FDC's) at the Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation.

Niue First Day Covers (FDC’s) at the Niue Philatelic and Numismatic Corporation.

Also available from the NPNC are specially issued Niue commemorative coins, which are produced by the New Zealand Mint.

Folders of Niue stamps at the NPNC.

Folders of Niue stamps at the NPNC.

The staff at the NPNC can be contacted for any overseas orders.

Contact details are:

The stamps of Niue feature local flora, fauna, landscapes and cultural and historical themes.

The stamps of Niue feature local flora, fauna, landscapes and cultural and historical themes.

Internet Services

Telecom Niue is the only telecom service provider on the island.

Telecom Niue is the only telecom service provider on the island.

One of the first stops for many visitors to Niue is the office of Telecom Niue, the sole provider of telecom services on the island.

Telecom Niue does not have any international roaming agreements with foreign operators; therefore, you cannot use roaming while in Niue.

The Visitor SIM package from Telecom Niue.

The Visitor SIM package from Telecom Niue.

If you wish to have internet connection while on Niue, you will need to buy a Visitor SIM card, which can be purchased from the Telecom Niue office which is located in the Alofi Commercial Centre.

All services are provided on a fast 4G network. However, if there is a power outage in Alofi (as happened several times during my stay), internet is lost across the entire island.

A Visitor SIM costs NZ$50, is valid for 14 days and includes 6GB of data, plus unlimited local calls, and 10 minutes of calls to Australia or New Zealand.

Costs

The menu at the popular Fana Cafe.

The menu at the popular Fana Cafe.

Most people visit Niue for 7 nights, which coincides with the flight schedule. With a 2nd weekly flight now operating, it is possible to visit for 3 nights.

The cost of a holiday on Niue isn’t cheap, with the biggest expenses being flights, accommodation, car rental and food. Everything really!

Sample Costs: 

  • Coca Cola (1.5 litre bottle) at Swanson’s: NZ$7.50 (US$4.70)
  • Water (0.33 litre bottle): NZ$1.80 (US$1.13)
  • Can of beer at Crow’s Nest: NZ$5.00 (US$3.13)
  • Cafe Latte at the Crazy Uga Cafe: NZ$5 (US$3.13)
  • Scrambled eggs breakfast at Fana Cafe: NZ$15 (US$9.40)
  • Car rental (daily rate) from Niue 4×4 Rentals: NZ$60 (US$37.55)
  • Litre of fuel: NZ$3.50 (US$2.20)
  • Fish and chip meal at Crow’s Nest: NZ$11 (US$6.90)
  • Meal at the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue: NZ$30+ (US$18.80+)
  • Room at the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue: NZ$250+ (US$156+)
  • Airbnb cottage (David’s Fale): NZ$160 (US$100)
  • Return flights to Niue from Auckland with Air New Zealand: NZ$800 return (USD$500)

Shopping

Niue sarongs for sale at Niue International Airport.

Niue sarongs for sale at Niue International Airport.

Tahiono Art Gallery

Ahi Cross, who, along with her husband, artist - Mark Cross - operate the Tahiono Art Gallery in Alofi.

Ahi Cross, who, along with her husband, artist – Mark Cross – operate the Tahiono Art Gallery in Alofi.

As can be expected on a tiny, remote island, shopping opportunities are limited. There are a couple of shops in Alofi which sell locally produced artworks and handicrafts.

Despite its small population, the people of Niue are especially creative and talented. There are several artists living on the island, who produce magnificent works of art which make for ideal souvenirs.

The artwork of Mark Cross can be purchased at the Tahiono Art Gallery in Alofi.

The artwork of Mark Cross can be purchased at the Tahiono Art Gallery in Alofi.

One of the most prominent artists on the island is Mark Cross, a New Zealander who is married to a Niuean – the wonderful Ahi Cross (pictured above).

Mark and Ahi run the Tahiono Art Gallery which is located in the Alofi Commercial Centre.

The walls of the gallery display Mark’s paintings which depict Niuean scenes which are interpreted in his unique style.

Kauhi Krafts

The Kauhi Kraft shop is owned by Niuean artist Olga Wilson who is known for her floral artwork which is applied to a variety of materials, including textiles.

The Kauhi Kraft shop is owned by Niuean artist Olga Wilson who is known for her floral artwork which is applied to a variety of materials, including textiles.

Also located in the Alofi Commercial Centre is Kauhi Kraft.

This gallery/ ice cream shop is owned and operated by Niuean artist, Olga Wilson, and her husband, Alan Wilson, who is originally from Perth, Western Australia.

Olga is known for her floral artwork which she applies to a variety of materials, including textiles. If you are staying at the Scenic Matavai Resort Niue, you will dine on table runners which have been designed by Olga.

The specialty at Kauhi Kraft are hand-painted tea towels, table runners, cushion covers, sarongs and more.

The shop also serves ice cream, which is also served in the form of delicious milkshakes.

Swanson Supermarket 

Swanson Supermarket is the only supermarket on Niue.

Swanson Supermarket is the only supermarket on Niue.

The only supermarket on Niue is Swanson Supermarket, which is housed in the Swanson Commerical Centre.

Due to shipping costs, groceries on Niue are very expensive with a 1.5L bottle of Coca Cola at Swanson Supermarket costing NZ$7.50.

Due to shipping costs, groceries on Niue are very expensive with a 1.5L bottle of Coca Cola at Swanson Supermarket costing NZ$7.50.

Offering a limited range of groceries, everything at Swanson’s is expensive due to high shipping costs. Everything arrives by container on the monthly supply ship from Auckland.

By the time all shipping costs are included, everyday items end up being priced as luxury items.

As an example, a 2L bottle of Minute Maid apple or orange juice costs NZ$13, while a 1.5L bottle of any soft drink costs NZ$7.50.

A large box of cereal for NZ$18.20! Due to shipping costs, all groceries at Swanson Supermarket are very expensive.

A large box of cereal for NZ$18.20! Due to shipping costs, all groceries at Swanson Supermarket are very expensive.

If you are going to be self-catering while on Niue, it’s much cheaper to carry any packaged food items from Auckland, within your luggage allowance.

The giant Uga Crab at the Swanson Commerical Complex.

The giant Uga Crab at the Swanson Commerical Complex.

It’s hard to miss the Swanson Commerical Complex, thanks to the giant Uga Crab which has been installed on the street corner, in front of the complex.

Niue Bond Store

Next door to Swanson Supermarket is the Niue Bond Store which is the one liquor shop on the island.

Naturally, this is one of the most popular shops on the island, and sells a variety of NZ wine and beer, along with international brand spirits.

The shop also serves as Niue’s only duty-free alcohol store, with flight passengers able to shop prior to their flight back to Auckland.

K-Mark

The K-mark store is the closest thing you'll find to a real K-mart on Niue.

The K-mark store is the closest thing you’ll find to a real K-mart on Niue.

Also located in the Swanson Commerical Complex, K-Mark is the closest thing you’ll found on Niue to a real K-Mart store.

This veritable Aladdin’s Cave stocks all sorts of merchandise from toys, games, clothing, homewares and so much more.

Niue Visitor Information Centre

The Niue Visitor Information Centre is located in Alofi.

The Niue Visitor Information Centre is located in Alofi.

The Niue Visitors Information Centre in Alofi is operated by the friendly staff from Niue Tourism.

The "Tourism" license plate.

The “Tourism” license plate.

Two essential items which are available from the visitors’ centre are a map of the island plus the weekly guide which outlines the opening hours of all restaurants and cafes on the island.

Niue souvenirs for sale at the Niue Visitor's Information Centre.

Niue souvenirs for sale at the Niue Visitor’s Information Centre.

Apart from dispensing information, the visitors centre is a great place to find Niue souvenirs.

A display, at the Niue Visitors Centre in Alofi.

A display, at the Niue Visitors Centre in Alofi.

The visitors centre also includes informative cultural displays and a small display of artworks by local artists.


Contact details for the Niue Tourism:


Sightseeing

It's worth picking up a free Niue map from Niue Tourism.

It’s worth picking up a free Niue map from Niue Tourism.

The sightseeing section lists the sights of Niue, travelling around the island, in a clock-wise direction from Alofi.

A 'Welcome to Niue' sign, outside Niue International Airport.

A ‘Welcome to Niue’ sign, outside Niue International Airport.

Alofi

Tomb Point

A view of the port and the northwest coast of Niue from Tomb Point.

A view of the port and the northwest coast of Niue from Tomb Point.

Located across the road from the Alofi Commercial Centre, Tomb Point is a pleasant place to relax and take in the stunning views of the port and the west coast of Niue.