Feature: Fruits of Colombia: 'Flores' by Botero, Medellin, Colombia

Colombian Fruits

Date of Review: 26th of April 2016

Introduction

I’m temporarily residing in Cali, Colombia. Each day I go to my local market to buy some of the fresh fruit, which grows in abundance here. There is always a large variety of fruit, some of it truly exotic. I was curious to try all of these and thought sharing the tasting results in a blog would be a good idea.

Due to the topography of the country, Colombia is perfect for growing all types of produce, from tropical fruits on the hot, humid coastal plains to cooler climate fruits high up in the Andes mountain range to really exotic stuff in the hot and steamy Amazon basin. No matter what the required growing condition Colombia can provide it.

It was all very delicious and something I will repeat again elsewhere. Without further ado, here are the fruits in question.

 Yellow Dragon FruitYellow Dragon Fruit

English Name: Yellow Dragon Fruit

Spanish Name: Pitahaya Amarilla

Texture: Soft, leathery but firm skin/ soft and mushy fruit inside (like a kiwifruit)

Taste: Mild sweetness, slightly tart aroma, very much like a kiwifruit

Origin: The cactus this fruit grows on is native to Mexico. The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Used in fruits salads
  • Used in fruit juices with other fruits

 

NaranjillaNaranjilla

English Name: Naranjilla (translates from Spanish as ‘Small Orange’)

Spanish Name: Naranjilla (Ecuador & Panama)/ Lulo (Colombia)

Texture: Gritty skin, feels like sandpaper / soft, mushy, translucent pulp inside

Taste: Slightly tart citrus taste – like a lime

Origin: The plant this fruit grows on is native to northwestern South America (Colombia, Ecuador)

Local usage:

  • Used as a juice
  • Eaten with a sprinkle of salt
  • Is also great in a Pisco Sour

 

TamarilloBisected Tamarillo

English Name: Tamarillo or Tree tomato

Spanish Name: Tomate de árbol

Texture: Just like a regular tomato/ soft fruit inside which peels away easily from the skin.

Taste: Slightly acidic like a combination of passionfruit and tomato.

Origin: The tree this fruit grows on is native to the Andes region (Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Chile). The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Blended with water and sugar to make a juice
  • Used to make jams, spreads etc.
  • Blended with chili peppers to make a hot sauce

 

Banana passionfruitBisected Banana passionfruit

English Name: Banana passionfruit

Spanish Name: Curuba

Texture: A member of the passionfruit family, the skin is soft, just like a banana. The fruit is orange in colour with black seeds and scoops out just like a passionfruit.

Taste: Tastes sweet

Origin: The vine this fruit grows on is native to the Andes region (Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Chile). The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage: Used in juice, normally with milk – like a smoothie

 

Yellow-skin watermelonBisected yellow-skin watermelon

English Name: Yellow-skin watermelon

Spanish Name: Sandia Amarilla

Texture: Same as a regular watermelon

Taste: Similar to a regular watermelon but slightly more subtle in flavour

Origin: Hybrid watermelon developed in Asia

Local usage: 

  • Eaten raw
  • Used in juices
  • Used in fruit salads

 

GuavaBisected Guava

English Name: Guava

Spanish Name: Goiaba

Texture: Soft smooth skin/ firm pink pulp with numerous hard seeds

Taste: A little sweet and a little tart

Origin: The tree this fruit grows on is native to Mexico, Central America and northern South America. The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Eaten raw
  • Used in juices
  • Used in jams
  • Used in fruit salads

 

 

Star FruitBisected Star Fruit

English Name: Star Fruit

Spanish Name: Carambola

Texture: Thin, smooth, waxy skin/ crunchy, juicy, fruit.

Taste: Tart, sour, slightly acidic

Origin: The tree this fruit grows on is native to southeast Asia and the Indian sub-continent. The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Used in fruits salad
  • Used in fruit juice
  • Eaten with a squeeze of lemon

 

GranadillaBisected Granadilla

English Name: Granadilla

Spanish Name: Granadilla

Texture: A member of the passionfruit family, the skin is hard and slippery/ fruit consists of black seeds surrounded by a gooey, transparent pulp (just like a passionfruit).

Taste: Soft, sweet taste

Origin: The vine this fruit grows on is native to the Andes region (Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia). The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Eaten raw
  • Used in fruit salads

 

Custard AppleBisected Custard Apple

English Name: Cherimoya or Custard Apple

Spanish Name: Chirimoya

Texture: Hard outer flesh/ soft, creamy fruit with large black seeds

Taste: A mellow sweet taste/ like a cross between pineapple and banana

Origin: The shrub this fruit grows on is native to the Andes region (Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia). The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Eaten raw
  • Used in juices
  • Used in ice-creams and yogurts

 

Cape GooseberryBisected Cape gooseberry

English Name: Cape gooseberry/ Goldenberry (USA)

Spanish Name: Uchuva

Texture: Feels like a cherry tomato/ soft, mushy fruit with small seeds inside

Taste: Has a sweet, mildly tart flavor

Origin: The plant this fruit grows on is native to Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage:

  • Used in juices
  • Used in fruit salads
  • Used as a garnish for desserts in restaurants

 

Yellow passionfruitBisected Yellow passionfruit

English Name: Yellow passionfruit

Spanish Name: Maracuya amarilla

Texture: Same as a regular purple passionfruit (but much larger) with a hard, slippery skin / fruit consists of black seeds surrounded by a gooey, yellow pulp

Taste: As tart as a regular passionfruit

Origin: The vine this fruit grows on is native to the Amazon region of Brazil. The fruit is now cultivated worldwide.

Local usage: 

  • Used in juices
  • Used in ice-cream, yogurt and baking
  • Popular in a Pisco Sour for those for find the ‘Pisco’ taste to be too strong

 

Feature: Fruits of Colombia: Finally time to enjoy these fruits and other less exotic ones in a fresh fruit salad

Finally time to enjoy these fruits (and other less exotic ones) in a fresh fruit salad with some Greek yoghurt

 

About taste2travel.com

Other blogs from the region – Panama Bird Watching, Panama Travel Report

Author: Darren McLean

Darren is an avid traveler, photographer, travel writer, diver, adventurer and the author of taste2travel.com

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Feature: Colombian Fruits
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Feature: Colombian Fruits
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Feature: Colombian Fruits - a sampling and review of some of the fruits which can be found in the markets of Colombia, South America.
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Darren McLean

Darren is an avid traveler, photographer, travel writer, diver, adventurer and the author of taste2travel.com

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